Winners of the Tiny House 2021 Architecture Competition | News

Judith Zeng

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FIRST PLACE: MYCO-SHELTER by DANAHE ZIEHL TORRES and JOSé ANTONIO VICTORIA MARTíNEZ (Mexico). Image courtesy Impact.


International design competition platform Impact has announced its exciting list of winners in the Tiny House 2021 contest. 

Each participant was tasked with designing a comfortable living accommodation for two people in keeping with the newfound demands of pandemic living, which the jury says has “paved the way for a great opportunity to
create a versatile and innovative personal space.”

This year’s panel of judges included new American Academy of Arts and Letters member Nader Tehrani and MIA Design Studio’s Nguyen Hoang Manh among several other international architects. The winners each split a total prize of $10,000, with $5,000 going to the 1st prize winners and $2,500 and $1,500 given to the 2nd and 3rd prize winners respectively. Each special mention entry received a $500 prize as well. 

All of the categories, including the Top 50 list, can be viewed here. A detailed list of Impact’s prize winners, Special, and Honorable mentions can be viewed below. 

FIRST PLACE: MYCO-SHELTER
DANAHE ZIEHL TORRES & 
JOSé ANTONIO VICTORIA MARTíNEZ (Mexico




MYCO-SHELTER by DANAHE ZIEHL TORRES and JOSé ANTONIO VICTORIA MARTíNEZ (Mexico). Image courtesy Impact.

MYCO-SHELTER by DANAHE ZIEHL TORRES and JOSé ANTONIO VICTORIA MARTíNEZ (Mexico). Image courtesy Impact.

Architects’ Statement: “Human beings are always evolving and so are their needs. The COVID-19 pandemic led us to rethink today. This situation has pushed us towards a simpler lifestyle, one to redefine ourselves and reinvent how we coexist with each other as we strive to do so in symbiosis with nature. Myco-Shelter is just a small component of a much deeper and intricate network. It functions as asymbiotic node, a place where dissimilar organisms form intimate and beneficial associations. Additionally, it is a symbiont itself, a living organism, complex and dynamic, that breaches, mutates,and transforms over time; adapting and responding to the climatic and atmospheric variants from its natural environment.”

SECOND PLACE: THE FOLDING HOUSE
CLéMENT VIGNES, MARTY ILIEVSKI & CAMILLE DESILLE (France)


THE FOLDING HOUSE by CLéMENT VIGNES, MARTY ILIEVSKI & CAMILLE DESILLE (France). Image courtesy Impact.

THE FOLDING HOUSE by CLéMENT VIGNES, MARTY ILIEVSKI & CAMILLE DESILLE (France). Image courtesy Impact.

Architects’ Statement: “Who said tiny? The principle of the folding house is to allow users to expand their houses according to the season, the weather and the context in which it is located. With climate change, temperatures are more and more extreme, we think that this house must be able to adapt to these extremes. In winter, the house is a self-sufficient tiny house, with a wood stove, solar panels, a rainwater collection system and two gas bottles if the light does not allow to generate enough electricity. It benefits from through openings in all the rooms. It is composed of wood frame walls insulated with hemp wool and clad with wood. The house protects itself from the cold. The interior heat is preserved.In spring and summer the heat increases. We live more outside and want to enjoy it. The house expands in consequence. The facades turn and become a floor, It becomes additional spaces between the interior and the exterior. These spaces are covered by a waterproof tent, protecting us from rain, sun and mosquitoes. A system of motorized jacks allows its deployment. The house remains autonomous in summer and benefits from the same devices, solar, water, that in winter.”

THIRD PLACE: SUNGAI LIMA VILLAGE. MALAYSIA 
LENNY LEW LEE LIANG LEW (United Kingdom) 


SUNGAI LIMA VILLAGE. MALAYSIA by LENNY LEW LEE LIANG LEW (United Kingdom). Image courtesy Impact.

SUNGAI LIMA VILLAGE. MALAYSIA by LENNY LEW LEE LIANG LEW (United Kingdom). Image courtesy Impact.

Architects’ Statement: “Sungai Lima Village, located in an island called Pulau Ketam at the west part of Malaysia. It is well known for their wooden houses rested on wooden stilts and their unusual amount of long bridges for local fishermen’s to dry their catch as the village is also well known for their dried salted fish. The fishermen would stand under the sun each day to flip and rotate each fish so that all the fish they caught would be dried equally on both sides while maintaining the exact texture they wanted for the dried fish. Despite so, most of the bigger fish still end up spoiled as the time precision to flip can be vary. Our design proposal seek to improve the drying fish technique while providing learning experiences for visitors. Each house has its own rotating mechanism for drying fish that located at the front part which ext ends from the unused space of the roof to ensure the fish would receive adequate sunlight to dry. One could rotate the mechanism while hang the fish at the bar of the mechanism with a poll. Each mechanism of the house could dry up to 160 fish.”

SPECIAL MENTIONS

XYZ Slider House by RUILAN JIA (China) 


XYZ Slider House by RUILAN JIA (China). Image courtesy Impact.

XYZ Slider House by RUILAN JIA (China). Image courtesy Impact.

A Shelter for Enjoying the Wine by MATIAS DABBAH & JEREMIAS DABBAH (Peru)


​A Shelter for Enjoying the Wine​ by MATIAS DABBAH & JEREMIAS DABBAH (Peru). Image courtesy Impact.

​A Shelter for Enjoying the Wine​ by MATIAS DABBAH & JEREMIAS DABBAH (Peru). Image courtesy Impact.

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Hive Home by LENA SCHLEICHER & VICTORIA PEIL (Germany) 


Hive Hom​e by LENA SCHLEICHER & VICTORIA PEIL (Germany). Image courtesy Impact.

Hive Hom​e by LENA SCHLEICHER & VICTORIA PEIL (Germany). Image courtesy Impact.

A Home for a Marine Biologist by VICTOR BARRENECHEA, VICENTE FLORES & GABRIELA CASTILLO (Chile)


A Home for a Marine Biologist by ​VICTOR BARRENECHEA, VICENTE FLORES & GABRIELA CASTILLO (Chile). Image courtesy Impact.

A Home for a Marine Biologist by ​VICTOR BARRENECHEA, VICENTE FLORES & GABRIELA CASTILLO (Chile). Image courtesy Impact.


YUANG LI (China). Image courtesy Impact.

YUANG LI (China). Image courtesy Impact.

The Freed by MAHMOUD WAHDAN, HAGER SAID ALFRARGY & AHMED ESSAM ATTIA (Egypt)


The Freed by ​MAHMOUD WAHDAN, HAGER SAID ALFRARGY & AHMED ESSAM ATTIA (Egypt). Image courtesy Impact.

The Freed by ​MAHMOUD WAHDAN, HAGER SAID ALFRARGY & AHMED ESSAM ATTIA (Egypt). Image courtesy Impact.

MSF Pod by CECILE NGOC SUONG PERDU & HồNGUYễN NGọC Hà (Vietnam)


MSF Pod by ​CECILE NGOC SUONG PERDU & HồNGUYễN NGọC Hà (Vietnam). Image courtesy Impact.

MSF Pod by ​CECILE NGOC SUONG PERDU & HồNGUYễN NGọC Hà (Vietnam). Image courtesy Impact.

The Suitcase by CHANASIT CHOLASUEK & APICHART
SRIROJANAPINYO (Thailand) 


The Suitcase by CHANASIT CHOLASUEK & APICHART SRIROJANAPINYO (Thailand). Image courtesy Impact.

The Suitcase by CHANASIT CHOLASUEK & APICHART SRIROJANAPINYO (Thailand). Image courtesy Impact.

Ilé Ireti “House of Hope” by FEYISITAN FAKOLADE & ABUBAKAR SHEHU BANGAJE (Nigeria) 


Ilé Ireti “House of Hope' by FEYISITAN FAKOLADE & ABUBAKAR SHEHU BANGAJE (Nigeria). image Courtesy Impact.

Ilé Ireti “House of Hope” by FEYISITAN FAKOLADE & ABUBAKAR SHEHU BANGAJE (Nigeria). image Courtesy Impact.

Microhome for Roommates by LUCIA LOPEZ VIñUELA & GUILLERMO BERNALDO DE QUIRóS GONZALO (Spain)


Microhome for Rommates by LUCIA LOPEZ VIñUELA & GUILLERMO BERNALDO DE QUIRóS GONZALO (Spain). image courtesy Impact.

Microhome for Rommates by LUCIA LOPEZ VIñUELA & GUILLERMO BERNALDO DE QUIRóS GONZALO (Spain). image courtesy Impact.

Portulaca Cabin by JOSHUA NIEVES (United States)


Portulaca Cabin by J​OSHUA NIEVES (United States). Image courtesy Impact.

Portulaca Cabin by J​OSHUA NIEVES (United States). Image courtesy Impact.

Float House by DUY ANH VU TRAN (Vietnam)


Float House by DUY ANH VU TRAN (Vietnam). Image courtesy Impact.

Float House by DUY ANH VU TRAN (Vietnam). Image courtesy Impact.










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